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Who is the buddha?

Who is the buddha?

The Buddha, also known as Siddhartha Gautama, was a spiritual teacher and the founder of Buddhism. He is believed to have lived in the 6th and 5th centuries BCE in ancient India. Siddhartha Gautama is not considered a deity but rather an enlightened being who attained supreme wisdom and insight, becoming the Buddha.

The story of Siddhartha’s life is central to Buddhist tradition. According to the traditional narrative, Siddhartha was born into a royal family in Lumbini, in present-day Nepal. His father, King Suddhodana, shielded him from the harsh realities of life, but Siddhartha eventually encountered the “Four Sights” — an old man, a sick person, a corpse, and a monk — which led him to reflect on the nature of suffering and the impermanence of life.

Motivated by a deep desire to understand the causes of human suffering, Siddhartha renounced his princely life and set out on a spiritual quest. After years of ascetic practices and meditation, he attained enlightenment under the Bodhi tree in Bodh Gaya, India. This event marked the culmination of his quest for understanding, and he became known as the Buddha, meaning the “Awakened One” or the “Enlightened One.”


The Buddha’s teachings, known as the Dharma, focus on the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path. The Four Noble Truths articulate the nature of suffering and the path to its cessation, while the Eightfold Path provides guidelines for ethical and mental development.

Buddhism spread throughout Asia and eventually to other parts of the world. Different schools of Buddhism emerged over time, each with its interpretations and practices, but the fundamental teachings of the Buddha remain central to the various traditions within Buddhism.

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